I am going to CUNY and NYU to meet Natural Language Processing scientists…

11 Aug
 

Today was very productive in my efforts to network with interested people. Mayor Bloomberg’s Expert was extremly helpful to turn me into networking for technical people to join forces. Actually, this was always advised to me from the beginning. First, at the Tech Meetup at  New York University, almost all developers I talked with advised me to keep on networking for natural language processing engineers. Then again, at the Intel Meego Lab, all developers advised same thing. At the Monday morning breakfast at the Science Industry and Business Library, people advised me to keep on networking. Then at the BMW Gugenheim Lab, presenters also advised the same thing. Later today, as I visited the Industrial Technology Assistance Corporation [ITAC] in downtown Manhattan, where they also advised me to network for technical guys.

Okay, so finally I made up my mind to get up early in the morning and try to network with the natural language processing community at New York University and the City University of New York  in Manhattan. Great decision. I am proud of myself. Stay tuned. I will post the news.  

Empire State Building.  Image by Daniel Schwen, from Wikimedia Commons.Welcome to the “NLP at CUNY” homepage, which provides information about the natural language processing and computational linguistics research community at The City University of New York. Faculty and students at CUNY are conducting research in several areas of NLP, including machine translation, text analysis and evaluation, information extraction, psychocomputational modeling of language understanding, natural language generation, and speech recognition and analysis.

CUNY is the largest urban university in the United States, and it consists of over 20 campuses throughout New York City. Research in NLP is conducted at several of these campuses, including the Graduate School and University Center, Queens College, and Hunter College. This website is a hub for information about research projects, special events, and other computational linguistics resources across CUNY.

This website contains information about faculty and students interested in NLP; NLP research laboratories and projects; special events, seminars, and guest speakers; relevant courses and academic degree programs at CUNY; and information about signing up for our mailing list so that you can stay informed about special events and opportunities.

If you have questions or would like to contact us, please e-mail one of the faculty members listed on the people section of this website. Thanks for visiting

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Welcome to the Proteus Project

Members of the Proteus Project have been doing Natural Language Processing (NLP) research at New York University since the 1960’s. Our long-term goal is to build systems that automatically find the information you’re looking for, pick out the most useful bits, and present it in your preferred language, at the right level of detail. One of our main challenges is to endow computers with linguistic knowledge. The kinds of knowledge that we have attempted to encode include vocabularies, morphology, syntax, semantics, grounding, genre variation, and translational equivalence. We work on both deterministic and stochastic knowledge models.

The Proteus Project members are simultaneously scientists and engineers. We are driven by the quest for knowledge, but we also love to build things that work (that nobody else has built before). Consequently, our devotions cover the range from the most basic research to immediately useful resources and applications. The diversity of the project members is reflected in the diversity of our work styles: Some of us prefer to encode linguistic knowledge from introspection; others prefer to build systems that can learn for themselves.

We focus on the application areas of Information Extraction and Machine Translation. This choice of emphasis constantly broadens our horizons, because almost any advance in NLP may lead to better solutions for these problems. Therefore, we like to pay attention to the whole field of NLP, as well as a number of related fields, such as machine learning, linguistics, and software engineering.


We host the NSF sponsered symposium on Semantic Knowledge Discovery, Organization and Use.


The Proteus Project is supported by grants and contracts from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), NTT Corporation and Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd, as well as by gifts from Sun Microsystems.


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